Watson & Crick






JAMES WATSON


Born: April 6, 1928 in Chicago, Illinois
Nationality: His father's side was of English descent and his mother's side was Scottish and Irish
Education: 8 years at Horace Mann Grammar School, 2 years at South Shore High School, then attended the University of Chicago
Occupation: A professor at the Harvard Biology DepartmentDeath Date: HE's ALIVE!
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Watson (left - the one who sorta looks like Don Knotts) and Crick (right) smile for the camera!





FRANCIS HARRY COMPTON CRICK

Born: June 8, 1916 in Nothampton, England
Nationality: English
Education: Northampton Grammar School, Mill Hill School, and University College in London
Occupation: Worked at Strangeways Research Laboroatory with the Medical Research Council Unit
Death Date: July 28, 2004

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Watson (left) and Crick (right - who is trying to look like he knows what he's doing) explain their double-helix model.




DNA DISCOVERY


Watson and Crick suggested that a DNA molecule was made of two chains of nucleotides, each in a helix, but one going up and the other going down. Having just learned about Chargaff’s findings about base pairs, they added this to the model, so that the matching base pairs interlocked in the middle of the double helix to keep the distance between the chains constant. Watson and Crick also showed that each strand of the DNA molecule was a template for the other. In the process of DNA replication, they suggested that during cell division, the two strands separate and on each new strand a new half is formed, identical to the one before. This is why DNA can produce itself without changing its structure (except for mutations).



Summary:

Watson and Crick proposed the double-helical structure and DNA replication.

WANNA LEARN MORE ABOUT DNA?


DNA Brainpop video

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Watson and Crick's DNA model




Bibliography


1. http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/1962/watson-bio.html

2. http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/1962/watson-bio.html

3. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aso/databank/entries/do53dn.html
4. http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/watson_and_crick.shtml


Pictures (in the order they appear):


1. http://www.packer34.freeserve.co.uk/main_watson_crick.jpg

2. http://www.chem.ucsb.edu/~kalju/chem110L/public/tutorial/images/WatsonCrick.jpg
3. http://www.ocean.udel.edu/extreme2004/genomics/images/dnaillustration.gif